Euonymus alatus • Winged Spindle Tree

Euonymus • Spindle Tree • ニシキギ • 錦木 • nishiki-gi

They grow in many areas (A,C,E,R,V,W) of the Garden, but noticeable mainly in autumn, when they get their famous vivid red leaves color that earned them a common name of ‘burning bush’.

SJG • 10/31/14 - Euonymus alatus (winged spindle tree, burning bush) in Area V, by  Zig Zag bridge. Has vivid red leave color in autumn.

SJG • 10/31/14 – Euonymus alatus (winged spindle tree, burning bush) in Area V, by Zig Zag bridge – it is the vivid red bush in foreground, with some leaves dropped underneath.

SJG • 11/17/14 - Euonymus Alatus (winged spindle tree, burning bush) in Area R: after the vivd red leaves fall down one can notice small red fruits, called arils.

SJG • 11/17/14 – Euonymus Alatus (winged spindle tree, burning bush) in Area R: after the vivd red leaves fall down one can notice small red fruits, called arils.

From wikipediaEuonymus alatus, known variously as winged spindle, winged euonymus or burning bush, is a species of flowering plant in the family Celastraceae, native to central and northern China, Japan, and Korea.

This deciduous shrub grows to 2.5 metres (8 ft 2 in) tall, often wider than tall. The stems are notable for their four corky ridges or “wings”. The word alatus (or alata, used formerly) is Latin for “winged”, in reference to the winged branches. These unique structures develop from a cork cambium deposited in longitudinal grooves in the twigs’ first year, unlike similar wings in other plants.[1] The leaves are 2–7 centimetres (0.79–2.76 in) long and 1–4 centimetres (0.39–1.57 in) broad, ovate-elliptic, with an acute apex. The flowers are greenish, borne over a long period in the spring. The fruit is a red aril enclosed by a four-lobed pink, yellow or orange capsule.

The common name “burning bush” comes from the bright red fall color. […]

I have noticed that euonymus alatus is on the several lists of invasive species, such as this one from the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health and USDA:
[…] Ecological Threat: Euonymus alatus can invade not only a variety of disturbed habitats including forest edges, old fields, and roadsides but also in undisturbed forests. Birds and other wildlife eat and disperse the fruit. Once established, it can form dense thickets, displacing native vegetation. It is native to northeastern Asia and was first introduced into North America in the 1860s for ornamental purposes. This plant is still sold and planted as an ornamental. […]

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