Prunus serrulata ‘Shirotae’ •  Japanese flowering ‘Mt. Fuji’ cherry

Prunus serrulata  • Japanese Flowering Cherry  •  サクラ •  桜 •  sakura

This tree was in a group post last year, now separate entry.  Five of them grow in the orchard and right now blooming with snowy white semi-double flowers, but usually just the one planted near the original tree (1960) from Crown Prince Akihito of Japan is pointed out to visitors.  (The original tree was lost to snow several years ago and replaced in 2009 with a tree grafted from the original; it was re-dedicated to Prince Akihito in the presence of Consul of Japan; commemorative stone plaque is near it.)

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SJG • 4/10/13 – Prunus serrulata ‘Shirotae’ •  Japanese flowering ‘Mt. Fuji’ cherry; 5 of them in Area U

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SJG • 4/10/13 – Prunus serrulata ‘Shirotae’ •  Japanese flowering ‘Mt. Fuji’ cherry;
FLOWERS

From Bernheim Aboretum and Research ForestCommon Name: Oriental cherry, Japanese flowering cherry, ‘Mt. Fuji’ flowering cherry, “Shirotae’ flowering cherry

NATIVE RANGE AND HABITAT: Oriental cherry is native to Japan, China and Korea. The species has over 120 cultivated varieties, which are usually grafted onto Mazzard cherry (Prunus avium) stock. Many of the cultivars originated many years ago in Japan. ‘Mt Fuji’ has a spreading habit and large semi-double white flowers. Mature height is 15 to 20 feet with a similar spread. […]

From backyard gardener‘Mt Fuji’ is pink in bud opening into fragrant, white, semi-double flowers up to 2 inches wide. Flowers earlier than some cultivars. Foliage is pale green with bronze tinge when young, habit is spreading, 15-20 feet or greater. Rounded to horizontal, deciduous tree with beautiful, coppery-red, glossy, peeling bark. Dark green leaves are lance-shaped and tapered to 4 inches long, turning yellow in the fall. White flowers are bowl-shaped to 3/4 inch across, solitary or in groups of 2 to 4, borne as leaves emerge. […]

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