Paulownia tomentosa • (also known as the Empress Tree, Princess Tree or Foxglove Tree)

Paulownia • Empress Tree •  キリ • 桐 • kiri

We have one living outside of the Garden, between the parking lot and the entrance courtyard, in Area A – it is rather hard to photograph, because of the other trees shading it and its mature size, making the distance between the camera lens and the flower hard to navigate:

Image

SJG • 5/28/12 – Paulownia tomentosa • (also known as the Empress Tree, Princess Tree or Foxglove Tree); Area A – between parking lot and the entrance courtyard

Image

SJG • 5/28/12 – Paulownia tomentosa • (also known as the Empress Tree, Princess Tree or Foxglove Tree); Area A – flowers

Here is the Missouri Botanical Garden write-up (click for the pics) on Paulownia tomentosa: […] Native to China, royal paulownia (empress tree or princess tree) is a fast-growing, deciduous tree that is primarily grown for its profuse spring bloom of foxglove-like flowers and its large catalpa-like green leaves. It was first introduced into the United States in the mid 1800s, and has since escaped cultivation and naturalized in many areas of the eastern U.S. It is an upright to spreading deciduous tree that typically grows to 40’ tall with a rounded crown. It is noted for its profuse bloom of fragrant, tubular, funnel-shaped, pinkish-lavender flowers (to 2” long) with interior dark purple spotting and creamy yellow striping. Flowers appear in spring in clusters (to 14” long) before the foliage. Flower aroma is reminiscent of vanilla. Flowers are edible and are sometimes added to salads. […]

And here is the wikipedia entryPaulownia tomentosa (also known as the Empress Tree, Princess Tree or Foxglove Tree) is a deciduous tree in the genus Paulownia, native to central and western China, but invasive in the US.[1][2] It grows to 10–25 m tall, with large heart-shaped to five-lobed leaves 15–40 cm across, arranged in opposite pairs on the stem. […]

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s